3rd Party Repositories

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Can anyone comment on the use of 3rd party repos for newer versions of software like php, python and mysql? Two I am aware of are puias and ius.

Is one preferable to the other? Can their packages be installed in parallel to and without interfering with base packages?

22 thoughts on - 3rd Party Repositories

  • isdtor wrote:

    We use epel and rpmfusion; there are no conflicts. Elrepo we only use for
    *very* specific things (like the systems I can use kmod-nvidia on). rpmforge frequently has conflicts.

    mark

  • —– Original Message —–
    | Can anyone comment on the use of 3rd party repos for newer versions
    | of
    | software like php, python and mysql? Two I am aware of are puias and
    | ius.
    |
    | Is one preferable to the other? Can their packages be installed in
    | parallel
    | to and without interfering with base packages?

    Whenever possible stick with base OS packages, otherwise, tread lightly for there may be demons.

    Only enable repositories when you absolutely need them and only for the software that you know work. This is in fact what we do, which makes software management with puppet slightly harder.

    You should also be careful to implement yum priorities to as to avoid third party packages from overwriting base and updates.


    James A. Peltier Manager, IT Services – Research Computing Group Simon Fraser University – Burnaby Campus Phone : 778-782-6573
    Fax : 778-782-3045
    E-Mail : jpeltier@sfu.ca Website : http://www.sfu.ca/itservices

    “A successful person is one who can lay a solid foundation from the bricks others have thrown at them.” -David Brinkley via Luke Shaw

  • We have used IUS on systems, and have had success with it. IUS, while not officially supported by Rackspace, is “funded” by Rackspace, and it is the
    “upstream” from which Rackspace pulls to have updated PHP/MySQL/etc for their older RHEL systems.

    j

  • note that there is now a php5.3 in the base repository, I believe it was part of the 6.4 update, its called php53. I would use this over a 3rd party packaged version unless there’s an overriding reason you need a different build.

  • Also, isn’t there a way to download the packages / apps that you want directly from the homepage? for instance Debian didn’t come with the latest version of LibreOffice, so my friend just went to the LibreOffice site and downloaded and installed the latest version. Not sure if this is the same with .rpm based distros but I don’t see why not? This would also allow you to be “selective” and use / install JUST the packages you need or want without dealing with changing or messing with your repos.

    EGO II

  • as long as these are installed somewhere other than the default system directories (/opt/whatever or /usr/local/whatever are good choices), such that they don’t interfere with the stuff under rpm/yum management, you’re OK. just remember, they won’t get updated unless you update them.

    a frequent issue with non-packaged software like this is dependencies.
    maybe it was compiled and built to run with older or newer libraries than your particular system, this can cause all sorts of ugliness if you try and ‘fix’ your system to make that specific program work.

  • Sure, but this can be time-consuming, not every software package provides a suitable rpm, and even if they do, you still need to install the dependencies yourself, because rpm will just tell you they’re missing, not find and install them. A yum repo is more automated and convenient if one carries the software you want.

    You can always be selective about what software packages you install, no matter how many third-party repositories you use. The challenge with other repos is that they may provide conflicting packages, but you should be selective about which repos you install in order to minimize problems.

    The CentOS wiki has an entry about third party repositories:

    http://wiki.CentOS.org/AdditionalResources/Repositories

    I have successfully used rpmforge, EPEL, and ELRepo (specifically elrepo-kernel).

    –keith

  • Wow!….Didn’t know just how deep this subject was! I guess I’ll be leaving my CentOS 6.4 box well enough alone and will wait for the repos to update / upgrade my software and systems!…Thanks for the info!

    EGO II

  • You can install rpms with yum and it will do the dependency resolution for you.

    Many projects have yum repos that you can use to install their software onto CentOS and other RPM-based systems.

    The usage of 3rd party repositories allows a wealth of additional software that CentOS alone cannot provide. There is nothing wrong with making use of such repos. Just be aware that anyone can create a
    3rd-party repository, even Joe blogs down the road, even I have one to share work that I’ve done packaging software for my own systems and those of my clients, this is both good and bad as it means there is no upper limit to the sources of packages for CentOS, but it also means that there is no lower limit to the quality of the same. Caution is always advised when using a 3rd party repo.

    Peter

  • Your are confusing 5 with 6?

    CentOS 5 has php 5.1.6 *and*, i.e. alternately php53 5.3.3

    CentOS 6 always had php 5.3.3

    php seems to be one of the things where upstreams backporting strategy did not fit anymore.

  • Hard to backport when there is nothing to backport _from_. Upstream 5.1
    has been dead for a long time.

    As far as sane php I strongly urge anyone wanting modern php on C5 to use IUS and not the junk that Red Hat pushed for as their 5.3.3. IUS
    did things right, Red Hat… not so much.

    John

  • Ah yes, I got kernel-lt from elrepo…

    [root@jamflaps ~]# yum info kernel-lt

    | 5.0 MB 00:01
    Installed Packages Name : kernel-lt Arch : x86_64
    Version : 3.0.99
    Release : 1.el6.elrepo Size : 134 M
    Repo : installed Summary : The Linux kernel. (The core of any Linux-based operating system.)
    URL : http://www.kernel.org/
    License : GPLv2
    Description : This package provides the Linux kernel (vmlinuz), the core of any
    : Linux-based operating system. The kernel handles the basic functions
    : of the OS: memory allocation, process allocation, device I/O, etc.

  • And you mentioned earlier,

    Regarding kernel-lt / kernel-ml, you may want want to ask on the ELRepo’s mailing list. Alternatively, you can use CentOS forums if you wish, because the kernel-ml/lt maintainer Alan Bartlett is actively helping CentOS users there as the forum moderator. :)

    Akemi

  • Andrew,

    $ yum –disablerepo=* –enablerepo=epel info kernel

    Does not show any kernels except what is already installed. i suppose you have to enable testing and for that matter, looking in CentOS testing first would be better.

  • Hi Rob,

    Sorry, its not in in EPEL its in elrepo.

    [root@jamflaps ~]# yum –disablerepo=* –enablerepo=elrepo info kernel-lt

    Loaded plugins: fastestmirror, refresh-packagekit, security Loading mirror speeds from cached hostfile
    * elrepo: jur-linux.org Installed Packages Name : kernel-lt Arch : x86_64
    Version : 3.0.99
    Release : 1.el6.elrepo Size : 134 M
    Repo : installed Summary : The Linux kernel. (The core of any Linux-based operating system.)
    URL : http://www.kernel.org/
    License : GPLv2
    Description : This package provides the Linux kernel (vmlinuz), the core of any
    : Linux-based operating system. The kernel handles the basic functions
    : of the OS: memory allocation, process allocation, device I/O, etc.

  • yum –disablerepo=* –enablerepo=epel\* info kernel\*

    Elrepo has several sub-repositories defined:
    [elrepo]
    [elrepo-testing]
    [elrepo-kernel]
    [elrepo-extras]

    Bill

  • Yep! That’s the trouble with new-fangled gadets that enable C & P –
    eases mindless mistakes. :-((

    Where’d I lay my command line? … I had it just a few days, weeks, months, years, decades … ago.

    Thanks for straightening me up.

    Bill

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