CentOS 7: Firewalld.service Operation Time Out – Systemctl Firewalld Issues

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CentOS 6 Comments

I’m having a few issues with firewalld on a CentOS 7 install, in particular when using systemctl to start/check the status of the daemon:

Checking the firewalld daemon status
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# systemctl status firewalld firewalld.service – firewalld – dynamic firewall daemon
Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/firewalld.service; enabled)
Active: failed (Result: timeout) since Tue 2014-09-09 07:57:06 EDT;
2min 41s ago Main PID: 20212

Sep 09 07:55:35 CentOS.template.30kft systemd[1]: Starting firewalld –
dynamic firewall daemon… Sep 09 07:57:05 CentOS.template.30kft systemd[1]: firewalld.service operation timed out. Terminating. Sep 09 07:57:06 CentOS.template.30kft systemd[1]: Failed to start firewalld – dynamic firewall daemon. Sep 09 07:57:06 CentOS.template.30kft systemd[1]: Unit firewalld.service entered failed state.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

journalctl information from last trying to start it
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Sep 09 07:55:35 CentOS.template.30kft systemd[1]: Starting firewalld –
dynamic firewall daemon…
— Subject: Unit firewalld.service has begun with start-up
— Defined-By: systemd
— Support: http://lists.freedesktop.org/mailman/listinfo/systemd-devel

6 thoughts on - CentOS 7: Firewalld.service Operation Time Out – Systemctl Firewalld Issues

  • I don’t, the setup is quite basic actually with a single zone (public)
    with two services in it (/etc/firewalld/zones/public.xml):

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    < ?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>

    Public
    For use in public areas…



    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Which are both using the default service XML files found in
    /usr/lib/firewalld/services

    Thanks,

  • Well to help anyone else who may have this issue in the future, I
    asked in the #CentOS channel and JHogarth solved it pretty quickly.

    < JHogarth> Skyrail: systemctl stop firewalld ; pkill -f firewalld ;
    systemctl start firewalld
    < JHogarth> Skyrail: for future reference I find it useful to do a ps
    -efc and look for the process if it fails to start
    < JHogarth> systemd didn’t know about the process that it didn’t start in the first place of course

    So running those commands stops the firewall, kills the firewalld process and restarts it using systemctl so it has full control again. Makes sense when someone points it out to you!

    Thanks to JHogarth for that, hopefully someone else will find this useful in the future.

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