Documentation Link On New Firefox CentOS 7 Splash Screen

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Hey All,

I just installed the newest version of Firefox that was pushed to production today. When I started Firefox the CentOS 7 Is Here splash screen was displayed. Out of curiosity I clicked on the [Documentation]
tab at the top of the screen and got this:

http://www.CentOS.org/docs/

Does anyone else see a problem here?


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^ ^ Mark LaPierre Registered Linux user No #267004
https://linuxcounter.net/
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15 thoughts on - Documentation Link On New Firefox CentOS 7 Splash Screen

  • While useful, I don’t imagine that was Mark’s point. CentOS links to a very out of date website. So either the link should be changed or the linked page should be updated.

  • from somebody ;-)

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Valeri Galtsev Sr System Administrator Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics University of Chicago Phone: 773-702-4247
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

  • Well, until someone rewrites the redhat docs so they don’t violate copyright laws, and links to them on that CentOS.org/docs page, I’ll continue perusing and referring to the RHEL 6 and 7 documentation.

  • Alright then. May I suggest a solution that might satisfy both opinions.

    On the documentation page where the links to CentOS [345] are found place a statement to this effect:

    “CentOS is functionally equivalent to Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL)
    and is based on the same code, as released by Red Hat, and rebuilt by the CentOS community.” At this point briefly explain the moral conundrum that prevents you from linking directly to the RHEL
    documentation. Then provide the appropriate link to the appropriate RHEL documentation with the explanation that, “this is a link to the documentation for RHEL upon which CentOS is based.” There you have a disclaimer as well as an attribution.

    What say yea to this proposal?

    An undocumented computer program differs only slightly from a video game. Both are filled with mysteries, puzzles, and unanswered questions.


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    /(_)\
    ^ ^ Mark LaPierre Registered Linux user No #267004
    https://linuxcounter.net/
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  • I’m up for that. My time is a bit limited but I would like to help. Can anyone hold my hand a bit while I learn the ropes? I’m not much good at C or C++ but I can write documentation. Especially if it’s already pretty much written and all I have to do is copy and paste.

    First thing we will need is someone who is willing and able to head up this effort.


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    ^ ^ Mark LaPierre Registered Linux user No #267004
    https://linuxcounter.net/
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  • Is it legal to copy the documentation and replace trademarks? IANAL… :)

    Alternatively, if we can’t copy RHEL docs, can we copy Fedora 12~13,
    18~19 docs and adapt as needed? Or would be have to write everything from scratch?

  • Just my two cents: Anyone thought of asking Red Hat to use documentation? I think they are getting much from the community so to copy public accessible documentation when permitted by RH could be an easy way.

    Why not giving that a try?

    Am 18. Januar 2015 20:56:59 MEZ, schrieb Darr247 :

  • I don’t see why we couldn’t, or shouldn’t modify it, though, so logn as we first make sure to comply with the rest of the license provisions, ie remove RedHat trademarks, give appropriate attribution and link to the original docs, then we can go ahead and modify it wiki-style so that it reflects the differences in CentOS.

    Peter

  • opinions. questions.
    18~19 docs and adapt as needed? Or would be have to write everything from scratch?

    Yes, you can absolutely use the sources for Fedora Docs, providing the already stated measures to deal with the trademark issues are performed. Everything is at https://git.fedorahosted.org/cgit/docs/ .

    I would encourage anyone interested to delve in a bit more than copy +
    regex though. There are entities to interpolate, for example; we’d take patches to replace “Fedora” with “&PRODUCT;” to make things easier for the CentOS folks, for example – and in many places, you’ll see things like that already, because RHEL docs are downstream too. A CentOS
    publican brand would give the derivative books a distinct identity without diverging the sources. Or, some CentOS writers might want to Storage Administration Guide, which hasn’t been updated for a Fedora in quite a while, and most updates for el7 would be great for the current Fedora users too.

    I’m sure there are many areas where active collaboration would be a win for both distributions. At this point, maybe the CentOS-docs and/or docs@lists.fp.o lists would be a better venue?

  • It is good enough to take the Documentation and start taking out their trademarks, etc.

    And editing content too .. anything that is talking about RHN (for example) is NA.

    The bottom line is, if you want to use the Red Hat documentation it is is good as a reference, but it is not totally applicable. You know where to find it. But as CentOS is community supported, the community can (and should) take the documentation and turn it into CentOS specific versions.

    The CentOS project can facilitate an area in git that can be used for this and the CentOS-docs mailing list can be used as well.

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