More Selinux Problems …

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Hi,

how do I allow lighttpd access to a directory like this:

dr-xrwxr-x. lighttpd example unconfined_u:object_r:samba_share_t:s0 files_articles

I tried to create and install a selinux module, and it didn´t work. The non-working module can not be removed, either:

semodule -r lighttpd-files_articles.pp libsemanage.semanage_direct_remove_key: Unable to remove module lighttpd-files_articles.pp at priority 400. (No such file or directory). semodule: Failed!

Currently, only read access is required. Write access may be required later.

type=AVC msg=audit(1506168999.456:2350): avc: denied { getattr } for pid=28956 comm=”lighttpd” path=”/srv/data/files_articles/C3E3FC7C-6ABE-11E6-9BF7-9CD580EF3FB5″ dev=”sde” ino=22694488368 scontext=system_u:system_r:httpd_t:s0 tcontext=unconfined_u:object_r:samba_share_t:s0 tclass=file type=SYSCALL msg=audit(1506168999.456:2350): arch=c000003e syscall=4 success=yes exit=0 a0=55eea817ec80 a1=7ffe668ef300 a2=7ffe668ef300 a3=7ffe668ef270 items=0 ppid=1 pid=28956 auid=4294967295 uid=996 gid=994 euid=996 suid=996 fsuid=996 egid=994 sgid=994 fsgid=994 tty=(none) ses=4294967295 comm=”lighttpd” exe=”/usr/sbin/lighttpd” subj=system_u:system_r:httpd_t:s0 key=(null)
type=AVC msg=audit(1506168999.456:2351): avc: denied { open } for pid=28956 comm=”lighttpd” path=”/srv/data/files_articles/C3E3FC7C-6ABE-11E6-9BF7-9CD580EF3FB5″ dev=”sde” ino=22694488368 scontext=system_u:system_r:httpd_t:s0 tcontext=unconfined_u:object_r:samba_share_t:s0 tclass=file type=SYSCALL msg=audit(1506168999.456:2351): arch=c000003e syscall=2 success=yes exit=9 a0=55eea817ec80 a1=0 a2=3e a3=7ffe668ef270 items=0 ppid=1 pid=28956 auid=4294967295 uid=996 gid=994 euid=996 suid=996 fsuid=996 egid=994 sgid=994 fsgid=994 tty=(none) ses=4294967295 comm=”lighttpd” exe=”/usr/sbin/lighttpd” subj=system_u:system_r:httpd_t:s0 key=(null)
type=AVC msg=audit(1506168723.591:2342): avc: denied { read } for pid=28956 comm=”lighttpd” name=”C3E3FC7C-6ABE-11E6-9BF7-9CD580EF3FB5″ dev=”sde” ino=22694488368 scontext=system_u:system_r:httpd_t:s0 tcontext=unconfined_u:object_r:samba_share_t:s0 tclass=file type=SYSCALL msg=audit(1506168723.591:2342): arch=c000003e syscall=2 success=no exit=-13 a0=55eea817ec80 a1=0 a2=3e a3=7ffe668ef2a0 items=0 ppid=1 pid=28956 auid=4294967295 uid=996 gid=994 euid=996 suid=996 fsuid=996 egid=994 sgid=994 fsgid=994 tty=(none) ses=4294967295 comm=”lighttpd” exe=”/usr/sbin/lighttpd” subj=system_u:system_r:httpd_t:s0 key=(null)

Why isn´t there a simple way to allow access to files as needed?
Being like this, selinux is entirely unmanagable. Does it even do any more good than it keeps getting in the way?

2 thoughts on - More Selinux Problems …

  • SELinux is a labelling system, every process has a label, every object on the system has a label. There are rules in the kernel that allow access between process labels and system object labels, the kernel enforces the rules.

    Some how this content on your system. /srv/data/files_articles, got labeled as samba content (samba_share_t). Now you want to share it via lighthttp (httpd_t). If this content is only to be shared via lighthttpd, you would need to set the label to something that httpd_t can read.

    man http_selinux (selinux-policy-docs rpm)

    Will show you the labels.

    httpd_sys_content_t is the usually type for httpd read only content.
    httpd_sys_content_rw_t is the type for read/write content. There are commands in the man page that explain how to change the default labels.

    If you need to share this content via httpd and samba there are a couple of label types public_content_t, which allow you to share content with multiple services. Also explained in the man page.

    audit2allow is usually a secondary thing to use when there is no way to allow access.

    http://danwalsh.livejournal.com/30837.html

  • setenforce permissive tail -f /var/log/audit/audit.log | grep AVC | audit2allow -m

    … do whatever you want to allow, then kill “tail -f” …

    setenforce enforcing

    What did you try?

    You can get a list of installed modules using “semodule -l”. Module names don’t have a “.pp” suffix, typically.

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