Nouveau Crash On CentOS 6.5

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Hi,

I am running 64 bit CentOS 6.5, and have an intermittent problem where the desktop crashes with the following error

nouveau E[Xorg 6062]] failed to idle channel 0xccc0000

The only route I have out of it is to power down then restart. It is intermittent, where some days it does not happen, to 2-3 times per day. Have others had this experience and is there a solution?

Thanks in advance for any help

Best wishes Jan

9 thoughts on - Nouveau Crash On CentOS 6.5

  • From my experience, if you are using NVidia graphics cards you should probably change over to the proprietary NVidia drivers. They have fewer issues and better performance.

    Here are a couple of links on how to do this. We’ve had people who have had success with each of these 2 different methods:

    http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/instructions-on-how-to-make-nvidia-gtx645-graphics-card-run-using-nvidia-in-rhel-6-5-a-4175500802/

    http://rodgersnotes.wordpress.com/2013/07/07/installing-nvidia-drivers-on-redhat-6-4-and-removing-nouveau/

    Stephen Lewis Stephen.Lewis@IDT.com Computer Operations Support, ADC

    —–Original Message—

  • Yes, it seems to be about time for Linux folks to stop liking NVIDIA (and being stuck with proprietary binary drivers) and start liking more others who provide more documentation about their card internals thus giving open source teams enough information to maintain decently working open source drivers.

    [ – The one who favored ATI some 12 years back at the peak of Linux love to NVIDIA ;-)]

    Valeri

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    Valeri Galtsev Sr System Administrator Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics University of Chicago Phone: 773-702-4247
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

  • I’m not an expert to recommend something. I myself am using ATI usually
    (even after they were bought out by AMD). Usually Dell workstations
    (Desktops actually) have ATI card as one of choices. These cards are good ones, with discrete video memory (to the contrary to some video chips with
    “shared” memory, and yes, there are ATI videochips like with shared memory found in some laptops). So basically, if I’m awfully cautious I double check that it is discrete video memory. You know what “shared” memory is, right? It is portion of main RAM that that bad chip uses as its video memory. In addition to the fact that you are not getting some hardware
    (video RAM) that is implied by specifications, there is architecturally awful thing about that: you have video traffic (60 video frames per second worth, or 50 frames in Europe) on the memory bus. The traffic that doesn’t belong there in the first place, as video RAM is used for your screen content always. And portion of your RAM bandwidth is stolen as well. I
    would void computer science degree of the idiot who invented that. But its continuing existence is due to sad fact that mass customer is basing the choice in “pricegrabber” results to the contrary to technical worthiness..

    Just my 2 c.

    Valeri

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Valeri Galtsev Sr System Administrator Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics University of Chicago Phone: 773-702-4247
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

  • I used to use ATI. Accidentally, the last computers I bought had a NVIDIA card. I heard Linux support of both boards would be similar.

    When I bought a new notebook, I tested it with a live linux CD at the shop. I didn’t want to compare all hardware components with internet lists and search for drivers. Graphics worked, WIFI also out of the box!

    My desktop is a Dell machine. Linux support is flawless. Later I read in a computer magazine, that there are Dell machines where you hardly get the right drivers. That’s why I wouldn’t order a machine by mail-order anymore. Linux isn’t supported by Dell, they “recommend” Windows, at least in Germany.

    Oh, shared memory! That’s a good aspect.

  • Not quite so. Example: ATI card, 2 monitors with _different_ resolution, CentOS 6. Nouveau video driver (which in fact is wrapper using open source drivers) works perfectly: no need for sysadmin to gig into X11 manual configuration.

    The same: 2 monitors with _different_ resolution; NVIDIA card. No way! As open source driver can not handle this in nvidia case (details about how video RAM is laid out was never disclosed by NVIDIA). So you are stuck with proprietary binary NVIDIA driver in this case.

    More knowledgeable people will correct me. This situation (two monitors with different resolution) is quite often for me: when graduate students leave the Department, students who are still here can use their monitors as second monitor…

    Thanks. Valeri

    These ones always sets me off: video chips with fake non existent video memory; fake RAID card that are not capable to do even modulus 2 sum…

    Valeri

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Valeri Galtsev Sr System Administrator Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics University of Chicago Phone: 773-702-4247
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

  • Valeri Galtsev wrote:

    Um, I’m a tad confused here – so far as I know, nouveau is *only* the driver for NVidia cards, *not* for ATI.

    Note, also, that I’ve never managed to spend the time to get nouveau to support twin monitors; I use either kmod-nvidia, or d/l the proprietary ones from NVidia, which work just fine.

    mark

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