Use CentOS To Create A Bootable Mac OS X DVD From Dmg File?

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Hi,

Sorry if this is only half-CentOS-related.

In my office, I’m running CentOS on all my systems (server, workstation, laptop, sandbox PCs). A colleague brought me her MacBook Pro to upgrade it from OS X 10.5.7 to 10.11.6.

I downloaded the 5.8 GB dmg file and now I wonder how to create a bootable DVD with this using only Linux tools.

1. Can I simply burn this as a data DVD with K3B?

2. Or do I have to jump through burning loops using dmg2img, mount -t hfsplus, etc.

I only have a couple of double layer DVDs here, so before burning a pair of expensive coasters, I thought I’d rather ask here.

Cheers,

Niki

Microlinux – Solutions informatiques durables
7, place de l’église – 30730 Montpezat Web : http://www.microlinux.fr Mail : info@microlinux.fr Tél. : 04 66 63 10 32

10 thoughts on - Use CentOS To Create A Bootable Mac OS X DVD From Dmg File?

  • First OT answer. If you can boot your macintosh, you can put image on it somewhere, and just ckick or double click on it, macintosh will start what necessary to upgrade or install. If mac does not boot, yoy can power it on while holding two keys pressed: command + T . it will need network access, and will go into recovery boot that in addition to some utilities will let you install macos version the machine was sold with.

    I burn disk images routinely on FreeBSD, but I am sure all the command options are the same on linux:

    growisofs -Z /dev/dvd=/path/to/disk/image.iso

    where /dev/dvd is device resembling your burner.

    valeri

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Valeri Galtsev Sr System Administrator Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics University of Chicago Phone: 773-702-4247
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

  • command + R

    (for recovery mode). Sorry about all types I made: typing on android is sooo weird…

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Valeri Galtsev Sr System Administrator Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics University of Chicago Phone: 773-702-4247
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

  • If it supports it, which running 10.5.7 isn’t likely. Recovery Mode wasn’t on the hard drive until 10.6, and Network Recovery wasn’t until 2010 models.

  • Le 23/09/2017 à 19:36, Remik.ca a écrit :

    Long story short, I can’t seem to upgrade this thing.

    But the good news is, I’ve booted a few Linux Live CDs, and I think I’ll just replace Mac OS X with CentOS 7, if possible.

    Anyone here with experience on installing CentOS on a MacBook Pro? This model is from 2009. As far as I know (correct me if I’m wrong), Apple hardware always uses EFI.

    What can I expect? Flawless installation or countless hours of suffering due to completely unexpected problems?

    Cheers,

    Niki


    Microlinux – Solutions informatiques durables
    7, place de l’église – 30730 Montpezat Web : http://www.microlinux.fr Mail : info@microlinux.fr Tél. : 04 66 63 10 32

  • Le 24/09/2017 à 03:22, Scott Robbins a écrit :

    I was a bit angered by the OS X lock-in, so I decided to replace it with Linux. Unfortunately the hardware didn’t play well with CentOS (KDE
    would freeze with both the nouveau and the nvidia driver), but here’s what I managed to do.

    https://blog.microlinux.fr/ubuntu-xenial-macbook/

    Works like a charm now.

    Cheers,

    Niki


    Microlinux – Solutions informatiques durables
    7, place de l’église – 30730 Montpezat Web : http://www.microlinux.fr Mail : info@microlinux.fr Tél. : 04 66 63 10 32

  • Apple sells hardware. But people are buying it because they like MacOS
    (which Apple only allows to run on Apple hardware). And they pay more for the same hardware (we used to say that having macintosh is like driving Ferrari: Ford or Subaru will get you around, but Ferrari gives you that shic ;-) I have mixed feelings about MacOS and Apple over time, but I have to admit that MacOS has the best of both worlds: great GUI, and real UNIX
    under hood. I do not like several things about keyboard (as I my commands containd “Linuxisms” on FreeBSD when I switched to it, and these days I
    have “freebsd-isms” on Linuxes sometimes, I do have “macintoshisms”
    everywhere too). In the past some 20 years ago we had a joke: looking at mouse you can tell what system it is: 3 buttons – UNIX, 2 buttons:
    Windows, 1 button – Macintosh. Windows at some point jumped to many buttons, mac was staying with one button really long. But now they outdid themselves, they have “iPadish” gestures on their mouse. Now you can or rather have to pet their mouse (lightly going along its spine with two fingers for scroll). I pet my cats, bit to pet mouse, this is something
    ;-)

    Valeri

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Valeri Galtsev Sr System Administrator Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics University of Chicago Phone: 773-702-4247
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

  • I put CentOS 7 onto a MBP. I’m not sure what vintage it is but probably similar to yours. IIRC the install was relatively straightforward, including wireless and X11, two factors that were a huge PITA for me in the past on Apple laptops.

    –keith

  • Le 25/09/2017 à 07:02, Keith Keller a écrit :

    With CentOS 7 I only had one problem, which proved to be a showstopper. Normally I’m running a highly customized version of KDE on all my CentOS
    desktop installations (installation is described in detail on my blog at https://blog.microlinux.fr/poste-de-travail-CentOS-7/). On the MacBook Pro, KDE simply froze at startup. The KDE splash screen would show the first hard disk icon, then there would be a little chime, and that’s it, freeze.

    I’ve already seen this behavior on other older laptops, and a peek in
    /var/log/Xorg.0.log showed me that the card couldn’t render the desired effects (don’t remember the exact error message). And this even though I
    had installed the proprietary NVidia driver.

    The thing would probably have worked with Xfce or MATE, but I had a strict time limit for that installation. Ubuntu 16.04 worked pretty much out of the box – and is nice to look at – so I decided to go with that. Next time I’ll give CentOS 7 + custom Xfce a spin.

    Cheers,

    Niki


    Microlinux – Solutions informatiques durables
    7, place de l’église – 30730 Montpezat Web : http://www.microlinux.fr Mail : info@microlinux.fr Tél. : 04 66 63 10 32

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