Surveillance DVR

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Does anyone know of a DVR that runs Linux that does NOT USE Active-X, and/or allows logging in directly?

All I keep running into are crap that ->requires<- IE, and don't allow directly logging in. mark

21 thoughts on - Surveillance DVR

  • Arun Khan wrote:

    No joy, either this, nor zoneminder. Right now, we just have motion running on the servers that have the USB cameras plugged in; after the recent grief we had with the last upgrade to CentOS, when I wound up moving one camera that just would not work – the top 10% of the screen was fine, and the rest green, and the other I had to change the resolution to
    240×360 to get it to not do that, my manager asked me to look into appliances that we could manage from our servers.

    We’ve found Zmodo, and another one, but with *both* of them, though the DVR that comes with the set is running Linux, web control *REQURES* IE, and you can’t log in directly using SSH or telnet.

    mark

  • If the camera is running on Windows, you can probably stream directly from the device using ffmpeg. See here for details:
    http://trac.ffmpeg.org/wiki/DirectShow You would set the input as the camera and the output as a file, and add any codec options you want, etc…

    I’m sure there’s probably a similar mode for Linux. If nothing else, you can probe the camera to see what modes it supports, etc…, to make sure you’re picking one that works,

    ❧ Brian Mathis

    CentOS mailing list CentOS@CentOS.org http://lists.CentOS.org/mailman/listinfo/CentOS

  • Brian Mathis wrote:

    Active-X, and/or allows logging in directly?
    running on the servers that have the USB cameras plugged in; after the recent grief we had with the last upgrade to CentOS, when I wound up moving one camera that just would not work – the top 10% of the screen was fine, and the rest green, and the other I had to change the resolution to 240×360 to get it to not do that, my manager asked me to look into appliances that we could manage from our servers. DVR that comes with the set is running Linux, web control *REQURES* IE, and you can’t log in directly using SSH or telnet. from the device using ffmpeg. See here for details:
    any codec options you want, etc… you can probe the camera to see what modes it supports, etc…, to make sure you’re picking one that works, Ok, I *must* not have made clear what I was asking for. Let me try one more time….

    We want an appliance, such as
    < http://www.zmodo.com/4ch-h-264-full-d1-dvr-500gb-hdd-with-4-cmos-480tvl-ir-outdoor-security-cameras-with-11-leds.html>, that we can put on our network, and manage, and d/l videos for long-term storage, onto a server. We have exactly, um, two? boxes running Windows, and we normally do *nothing* with them. We’ve over 100 servers running Linux, and that’s where we live.

    Currently, the USB cameras are connected to ->CentOS SERVERS< -, no WinCrap at all. We use the standard package motion to record for surveillance. We're looking for an "appliance", like the link I give above, that we can manage the same way that we manage an HP printer, which does *NOT* require IE, and we can do with firefox, or probably even konqueror. At the very least, we want to use, say, wget, to d/l the videos. NOTHING RUNNING WINDOWS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Now, if I can calm myself down, have I made it clear what it is we’re looking for? If so, can anyone recommend a source for such an appliance? mark

  • Not knowing if / how much you’re willing to spend, take a look at a Synology NAS, which has Surveillance Station. You get one camera license with each one and then you have to buy additional camera licenses for about $55 each.

    Of course you’d be getting a lot more than just a surveillance DVR, so may or may not fit your needs. They are great devices.

    Good luck, James

  • Hello. We are using Kmotion, which as far as I have seen in our setup stores static images (JPEG) every couple of seconds. I don’t know many details about it though, as our Physical Infrastructure team set it up and manages it, but they are happy with it.

    I think saving images as opposed to video was decided based on the cost of the storage (over 60 cameras, too much data).

  • I forgot to add that it fulfills some of your requirements: runs on Linux servers, SSH access available of course, is free.

  • Marios Zindilis wrote:

    I’m researching them. A bit higher than I was looking at – we need to cover two rooms, floors apart, so it would probably be two appliances. I
    do need to be aware of costs, as this is a US federal gov’t agency
    (non-defense), and there’s this grandstanding thing called a
    “sequester”….

    Looks like a variant of motion, which, as I mentioned, is a standard CentOS package. That’s not the same thing as an “appliance”. Think
    “something we can plug in, just like a printer, but has cameras attached to *it*”.

    mark

  • James Pifer wrote:

    Well, that wasn’t what I wanted, but it led me to the acronym I needed to know: NVS, and thank you *very* much for leading me to that. Dunno if we want to spend 2x$600 from newegg for something with four definitely overkill cameras (we’re just surveilling our “computer labs” (these aren’t data centers, no, really, honest (that’s if you’ve read recently that the gov’t has suddenly started designating every server closet as a
    “datacenter”)), but at that price, it *does* support firefox, and http://ftp…. so we’re getting a lot closer.

    mark

  • James Pifer wrote:

    You mentioned ZoneMaster, and how it wouldn’t work for you. What does it lack?   I’ve recently been using it, and it seems to work quite well.
    … just curious..

  • James Pifer wrote:

    You mentioned ZoneMinder, and how it wouldn’t work for you. What does it lack?   I’ve recently been using it, and it seems to work quite well.
    … just curious..

  • Joseph Spenner wrote:
    servers running

    It’s not a plug-in appliance, it’s software. We are currently running the cameras on our servers, and my manager, as I’ve said, was considering a plug-in appliance, that we could access and back up from our Linux servers or workstations, and not have to worry that, as just happened with the last kernel update, it would break the drivers.

    mark

  • What about just buying another computer that you do not have to update?
    Give it only a local IP address so that the outside world cannot access it. If I understand what you want correctly, the new computer would not need to send data to the outside world. The new computer and the outside world could be blissfully unaware of each other.

  • I use an appliance from Smartvue – the Smartvue S9. They have a very small version – the S9i – now that has 128GB of SSD for ~$700 that will handle 10 cameras.

    http://smartvue.com/products/index.html

    I have been running the S9 version for a little over a year with only a few issues. It’s been very reliable and easy to use. It actually runs Fedora under the hood!

    Shawn

  • Hi, Shawn,

    Shawn Stephens wrote:
    Interesting – MSRP, $300, but that does not appear to include any cameras, and if it only takes IP cameras, that’s another $100 a pop, each…. Right on the edge of the budget.

    So, can you SSH into it, or rsync files, or even wget the files down for long-term storage? Does it require IE to control?

    mark

  • Lorenzo wrote:

    BING! Those *are* interesting, and the price is right on the edge of affordable. I’m looking for reviews now – I see the software’s been a Debian package, and installable on ubuntu (we’re 95% CentOS, though), and I see things from last year saying that an RPM will be out real soon now….

    Thanks very much. We may not do it – price, and Ubuntu, but this is right there.

    mark

  • One of my coworkers experimented with the Ubiquiti AirCam (the regular white ones, not the minis). I remember him saying the NVR software records still frames to disk rather than an actual encoded video. Meaning that if you needed to provide video to the police, insurance, whoever – you’re going to have to use their software to encode a video. Recording as still frames might be common, but I’d expect the software to run a job every hour or whatever to encode frames to video … but what do I know..

    I’m told the NVR software installs rather painlessly on Debian (since there’s a *.deb package), but beyond that it can be pain.

    The AirCams we used do not do infrared night vision which is a big bummer.

    If you want any further details, let me know and I’ll ask my coworker since he worked with them more than I did. ;)

  • SilverTip257 wrote:
    drivers.

    I was under the impression that when it detected motion, it saved it as a video. Still pictures every hour or so is normal.

    And if we need to show someone, that will be the campus police, and possibly the FBI – this *is* a US federal gov’t institution. Not a problem – the lights in our, aahhh, “computer labs” are on
    24x7x365.25, specifically for the cameras.

    Please. We’d want to d/l the jpgs and the mpegs (or avi, or whatever) via cron and rsync to a server for longer term storage and backup.

    mark

    mark

  • Hi Mark,

    If you lay off the coffee for a minute and actually take a look at what people are suggesting, you’ll see that ffmpeg is a standard, cross platform, very versatile (basically industry standard) tool for manipulating audio/video files, and it also has good support for capturing from devices. Frankly I had assumed that you had probably already heard of it. It’s the swiss army knife of video, and it works perfectly well on Linux as well as Windows. I only mentioned Windows because that’s where I
    had recently used it for device capture.

    ❧ Brian Mathis

    P.S. Should I also point out how far off topic this is, since you seem to want some sort of appliance?

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