Configuration Of Nagios

Home » General » Configuration Of Nagios
General 6 Comments

Hi Sir/Ma’am

can i request for configuration of CentOS nagios for moniotoring our servers and switches

thank you, rolly aquino

6 thoughts on - Configuration Of Nagios

  • > What have you done or tried? Did you check Google?

    Have you even read the documentation that comes with the package?

    We are not here as unpaid tech support to do your job for you.

    mark

  • Nagios documentation, as I recall, is pretty poor. Max had a great wiki article on it, but it’s dated. Still, if you look at the CentOS wiki article, enough of it may be the same for you to get started.

    Once you understand the wiki article, you can probably then begin to work with the nagios documentation, which becomes less obscure once you’ve gotten a grasp of it.

  • I’m not sure if it’ll help or make things worse, but inline below is a perl script I created to make nagios configuration a bit easier for me.
    $LOCATION is a directory you’ve created and added a line for in nagios.cfg, something like ‘cfg_dir=/etc/nagios/auto’, then feed in data files that look like:

    #hostname,ip:host-type srv-type :ht:ssh:hts:tcp:tcps:crit,warn router:linux-server:generic-service:0:0:0:80,443:0
    nemesis,1.2.3.4:linux-server:generic-service:0:22:0:3128:0:95,98 -i /dev/sr0
    spawn:linux-server:generic-service:80:22:0:53:0:85,95
    dengar:linux-server:generic-service:80,8080:0:0:0:0:0

    so for the ‘nemesis’ line, it creates a config for host nemesis, doesn’t use DNS, but sets the ip to 1.2.3.4, sets it as a generic linux server, all services as generic, doesn’t monitor http (ht set to zero means no monitor), checks SSH on port 22, no https check, does a generic tcp connection check for squid (3128), no ssl tcp checks, and then my own custom file system monitor for space that probably everyone other than me should ignore.

    so if you save this file as hosts.example, save the perl script below as
    ‘parse’ and run ‘perl parse hosts.example’ it’d create a nagios host group called ‘example’ with all these hosts grouped together and their various ports/services setup to be monitored.

    I’m sure there are tons of potential pitfalls, and this script should be considered beta at best, but I thought it was useful to me, so maybe it could be for someone else.

    oh, and the , configs. dengar is a good example it’s monitoring http connections on both port 80 and 8080

    and as a final note, the standard disclaimer should be understood; I
    offer this code with no sort of warranty whatsoever.

  • And for those who don’t like editing files, grepping, perling,…. (yes they exist :)
    There is nasgiosql (http://www.nagiosql.org/) a graphic web/mysql based tool that helps a lot. Of course it is better and easier to use, if one has a – at least basic – understanding of the way nagios/icinga works.

    Cu Hartmut

    I’m not sure if it’ll help or make things worse, but inline below is a perl script I created to make nagios configuration a bit easier for me.
    $LOCATION is a directory you’ve created and added a line for in nagios.cfg, something like ‘cfg_dir=/etc/nagios/auto’, then feed in data files that look like:

    #hostname,ip:host-type srv-type :ht:ssh:hts:tcp:tcps:crit,warn router:linux-server:generic-service:0:0:0:80,443:0
    nemesis,1.2.3.4:linux-server:generic-service:0:22:0:3128:0:95,98 -i /dev/sr0
    spawn:linux-server:generic-service:80:22:0:53:0:85,95
    dengar:linux-server:generic-service:80,8080:0:0:0:0:0

    so for the ‘nemesis’ line, it creates a config for host nemesis, doesn’t use DNS, but sets the ip to 1.2.3.4, sets it as a generic linux server, all services as generic, doesn’t monitor http (ht set to zero means no monitor), checks SSH on port 22, no https check, does a generic tcp connection check for squid (3128), no ssl tcp checks, and then my own custom file system monitor for space that probably everyone other than me should ignore.

    so if you save this file as hosts.example, save the perl script below as ‘parse’ and run ‘perl parse hosts.example’ it’d create a nagios host group called ‘example’ with all these hosts grouped together and their various ports/services setup to be monitored.

    I’m sure there are tons of potential pitfalls, and this script should be considered beta at best, but I thought it was useful to me, so maybe it could be for someone else.

    oh, and the , configs. dengar is a good example it’s monitoring http connections on both port 80 and 8080

    and as a final note, the standard disclaimer should be understood; I offer this code with no sort of warranty whatsoever.

LEAVE A COMMENT